Pasture Management 101: Starting a New Pasture from Scratch

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If you’ve ever been faced with starting a new pasture from scratch you won’t want to miss this week’s blog post I wrote for TheHorse.com for the scoop on how to successfully make it happen. Link below. Continue reading

My Horse has a Love Interest and Other Important Truths that can Totally Wreck a Horse Show Performance

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I’ve had some less than optimal horse show performances before but this one takes the prize.

We had been schooling since last show season. I had spent the better part of the week getting ready. By day I had worked my full-time job. By night, after a long day’s work and a training session with my horse, I cleaned tack. I packed. I clipped my horse and on the day before our departure I bathed her. The hotel reservations made, I journeyed off with my friend and horse show partner the evening before the show to get settled and to prepare for the early start ahead. Continue reading

Pasture Management 101: Renovating Horse Fields

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So many times I see horse facilities that have pastures in need of renovation. There’s a lot of reasons behind it and, for the most part, the property owners or managers truly want to do something to improve their pastures but they just aren’t sure what. That why, I really enjoyed writing this weekly, mini series of blog posts for TheHorse.com. In this week’s series installment I talk about how to evaluate your current pasture situation and what to do if you deem them lacking. Continue reading

Pasture Management 101: Grass Species

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Over the summer I was very fortunate to add some new clients. One of those clients is the well respected ‘The Horse’ magazine who asked me to write a weekly mini-series of blog posts on pasture management for digital publication. For this week’s blog post, I am very excited to share the first post in this series with you.  Continue reading

Why register?

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If I’ve owned a horse that was eligible for registration I’ve always registered it. Though I know many people who don’t, I’ve never understood why. Yes, it costs money but the benefits have always seemed to well outweigh any disadvantages. With the number of registered horses declining for most breed registries, let’s look at why I consider registration to be advantageous for you and your horse. Continue reading

Tackling a loose shoe

horseshoe-2662773_1920Thankfully, a loose shoe hasn’t happened to me in a very long time but when it has happened it has always been at the most inconvenient time. Here are some tips for dealing with a loose shoe before the farrier arrives.

Helpful tools: Nail clincher, small hammer, duct tape or boot, rasp, and clinch cutter

Perhaps you noticed it as you were cleaning out your horse’s hooves just before your ride, which is when I always seem to discover mine, or maybe you heard it during your warm up at the beginning of your ride.  Regardless, for a shoe that is only somewhat loose often times all that is needed for a band aid approach is a pair of clinches and a small hammer. Just as you have likely seen you farrier do hundreds of times, tighten each of the nails with your clinch. For any nails that were slightly looser than the others, lightly tapping them down with your small hammer can do just the trick. Of course each situation is different but in most cases you won’t have to completely postpone your ride for a shoe in this condition. Instead, keep close to home, monitor the shoe often, and dial back your ride to something light on good footing.

Shoes that are moderately loose will cause your ride to be postponed. In this case the hoof and shoe will need to be wrapped. I’ve used duct tape with good success but it does have its limitations and will require frequent changes if it will come in contact with damp or wet surfaces or corrosive surfaces such as rock or gravel. Boots can be a good option of you have one that can be worn over shoes.

Shoes that are extremely loose will need to be pulled altogether. If you’re unsure how to do it correctly, have your farrier demonstrate the method for you the next time he or she is out for a regularly scheduled visit. Wrapping or booting the shoe may be necessary to protect the hoof until your horse can be reshod. It should go without saying that your horse should also not be ridden until your farrier has visited and reattached the shoe.

Even if your horse’s regularly scheduled visit with the farrier is weeks away, place a call to him or her alerting them of the situation and arrange for them to come out early before the loose shoe causes any damage.