Why register?

Registration Blog Post.jpg

If I’ve owned a horse that was eligible for registration I’ve always registered it. Though I know many people who don’t, I’ve never understood why. Yes, it costs money but the benefits have always seemed to well outweigh any disadvantages. With the number of registered horses declining for most breed registries, let’s look at why I consider registration to be advantageous for you and your horse. Continue reading

Tackling a loose shoe

horseshoe-2662773_1920Thankfully, a loose shoe hasn’t happened to me in a very long time but when it has happened it has always been at the most inconvenient time. Here are some tips for dealing with a loose shoe before the farrier arrives.

Helpful tools: Nail clincher, small hammer, duct tape or boot, rasp, and clinch cutter

Perhaps you noticed it as you were cleaning out your horse’s hooves just before your ride, which is when I always seem to discover mine, or maybe you heard it during your warm up at the beginning of your ride.  Regardless, for a shoe that is only somewhat loose often times all that is needed for a band aid approach is a pair of clinches and a small hammer. Just as you have likely seen you farrier do hundreds of times, tighten each of the nails with your clinch. For any nails that were slightly looser than the others, lightly tapping them down with your small hammer can do just the trick. Of course each situation is different but in most cases you won’t have to completely postpone your ride for a shoe in this condition. Instead, keep close to home, monitor the shoe often, and dial back your ride to something light on good footing.

Shoes that are moderately loose will cause your ride to be postponed. In this case the hoof and shoe will need to be wrapped. I’ve used duct tape with good success but it does have its limitations and will require frequent changes if it will come in contact with damp or wet surfaces or corrosive surfaces such as rock or gravel. Boots can be a good option of you have one that can be worn over shoes.

Shoes that are extremely loose will need to be pulled altogether. If you’re unsure how to do it correctly, have your farrier demonstrate the method for you the next time he or she is out for a regularly scheduled visit. Wrapping or booting the shoe may be necessary to protect the hoof until your horse can be reshod. It should go without saying that your horse should also not be ridden until your farrier has visited and reattached the shoe.

Even if your horse’s regularly scheduled visit with the farrier is weeks away, place a call to him or her alerting them of the situation and arrange for them to come out early before the loose shoe causes any damage.

 

The Importance of Mentors

Mentors Blog Post

Following a great training session, I bent down to remove the splint boots from my horse’s legs. As I loosened the fasteners I thought to myself, “I need to call Joanne. She would really love to hear about this.” Thirty years of doing something becomes a habit. I had forgotten for a brief moment, as I sometimes do, that back in May I had lost my longtime friend and mentor. I stopped when the realization hit me. Oh. Grief is sneaky like that. Even if you are well past the initial shock and feel as if you have made peace with it, it can come upon you at the most unexpected of moments.

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Biosecurity Shortcuts – Six Easy Tips to Keep Your Horse Safe at Shows

Biosecurity Blog Post

You arrive at the show grounds the evening before the show begins. It’s late and you’re tired. You just want to get everything unloaded. But could you be putting your horse at risk just by putting him in a stall? The answer is yes.

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Treatment for your horse’s ringworm may be as close as your bathroom’s medicine cabinet

Ringworm Post

By now you know that ringworm (tinea) in horses is not actually caused by a worm. Instead, it’s a fungal infection whose symptoms may include scaly, crusty areas of your horse’s skin or raised, hairless patches usually seen along the sides of the neck or on areas where your saddle and/or girth come in contact with your horse’s skin. The fungus responsible is of the Microsporum and Trichophyton species. But did you also know that discovering a case of ringworm doesn’t always mean that you have to rush to purchase the latest and greatest over the counter treatment? Continue reading

Tail Rubbing: Getting to the Root of the Problem

Grazing Horses-min

After years of owning horses with sparse tails I finally have a horse with a thick, luxurious one. Her mane and forelock are quite average but her tail is simply gorgeous. The absolute best part for me though is that it requires very little to maintain. I know horse owners who would go to great lengths to have their horses grow and maintain tails like hers but aside from spritzing her tail with a little leave in condition once a week she does a fine job on her own of keeping her locks beautiful. That’s why, every once in a while, I get a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach when I discover that she has a rubbed, matted tail. Continue reading

Jump Rehab 101

Although I’m late to the party, I recently added a tagline to my blog. After a year of contemplation it finally hit me what my blog was really and truly about. I’m a DIY, budget conscious equestrian and many of my blog posts strongly follow this theme. That’s why this week’s blog post is especially fitting. Continue reading